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Posts Tagged ‘Adoption’

NuMac BluDrive Plus combines Blu-ray drive, 2TB of storage

October 9th, 2014 No comments

NuMac has announced the BluDrive Plus, an unusual new Blu-ray drive for Macs. Merged with it is 2TB of onboard storage, rated at 100MBs (for both reading and writing), which can be accessed via a separate USB 3.0 port. The Blu-ray component relies on its own USB connection….

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NuMac BluDrive Plus combines Blu-ray drive, 2TB of storage

DVD shops close before raid

March 12th, 2014 No comments

A handful of stores in Phnom Penh’s City Mall closed up shop yesterday morning, draping large curtains over their storefronts rather than face an impending police raid on businesses allegedly selling pirated movies there, police and other vendors said.

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DVD shops close before raid

'Halloween 35th Anniversary Edition' Blu-ray Review

October 16th, 2013 No comments

‘Halloween’ gets another digital release from the people at Anchor Bay Entertainment with its 35th anniversary release.

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'Halloween 35th Anniversary Edition' Blu-ray Review

Sony and Panasonic promise 300GB Blu-Ray replacement by 2015

July 30th, 2013 No comments

Will anyone bother with a standards war? Sony and Panasonic have announced a partnership to develop a new format of optical storage disc for data archiving to replace Blu-Ray, and plan to get a 300GB disc in the market by the end of 2015.…

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Sony and Panasonic promise 300GB Blu-Ray replacement by 2015

MOTHER AND CHILD Written Review

June 25th, 2010 No comments

“A MOVING SLICE OF LIFE”

poster art largeStarring: Naomi Watts, Annette Bening, Kerry Washington, Jimmy Smits. and Samuel L. Jackson

Directed by: Rodrigo Garcia

MPAA Rating: R for sexuality, brief nudity and language.

Genre: Drama

Release date: June 25, 2010

Run Time: 2hrs 6min

Studio: Sony Pictures Classics

By John Delia

Touching, graphic and profound the film Mother and Child delivers a moving and powerful slice of life.  The acting, direction and cinematography all blend into a story that fits with our modern day lives.  The interesting script although more directed at couples that are childless, should hit home with people who have had to deal with situations where an important decision changed their future.

Naome Watts and Samuel L Jackson

Elizabeth (Watts) and her boss Paul (Jackson) chat over dinner

The movie centers on three women, Karen (Bening), Elizabeth (Watts) and Lucy (Washington) each affected by adoption.  Karen is haunted from a decision she made to place her child up for adoption when she was 14.  Now in her older years she writes letters and notes in her journal to the child she didn’t keep.  She has become bitter over the years and jealous of anyone with children, especially her maid who brings her daughter to the apartment while she cleans.  Lucy grew up as an adopted child and although became a lawyer in a good firm, has chosen to be a loner.  Lucy on the other hand has been upbeat about her chances of adopting a child and becoming a mother.  When the three women get entangled due to fate, their destiny’s get played out.

Karen (Bening) tries to come to grips with her delimma

Karen (Bening) tries to come to grips with her delimma

The acting, direction and cinematography in the film are brilliant.  I enjoyed watching the gripping tale and the characters that were developed by Bening, Watts and Washington. Wonderful support by Elpedia Carrillo as Sofia the maid who understands Karen’s dilemma and gets her to come to terms with it.  Samuel L. Jackson takes on a huge role supporting both Watt’s character and Washington’s as well.  In an amazing performance Shareeka Epps who plays the teenage surrogate mother who offers her baby to Lucy then interrogates her with a demanding attitude.

I am pleasantly amazed by the pinpoint direction of Rodrigo Garcia who puts together

Director Rodrigo Garcia on the set

Director Rodrigo Garcia on the set

the two-hour film keeping several key points in the dark until their important reveal.  The complicated script was played out extremely well and his camera direction came through during crucial scenes.

Mother and Child is rated R for sexuality, brief nudity and language.

FINAL ANALYSIS:  A powerful moving story that delivers. (4 of 5 Palm Trees)